Saturday, May 23, 2009

Mt View Cedar Glade may 22 09

Tennessee Coneflowers starting to pop out among the Coreopsis lanceolata
which is native to Tennessee but i'm pretty sure its been planted in this glade.
nevertheless it doesn't seem to be causing any problems and it is quite beautiful.
Mt view glade is quite small, and it persists despite being surrounded by homes
for half a century, 10 feet away from a secondary highway,and most recently
having the surrounding forests and marginal glade areas clear cut for
neighborhoods with streets ironically named "coneflower trail" et.c.



Daisy Trail glade is drying up nicely, below you will see the
same spot inundated with lake water, daises along the trail
going strong, glade bluets and white sedum in the breeze on
a warm spring day with white fluffy clouds drifting along.




Sunday, May 17, 2009

White Moth Mullein Has a flower designed to make
insects like wood bees and moths fall in love with it,
seeking comfort in its furry arms and tricking the
insect into pollinating it. You've seen it along the roadsides,
its not native to the glades but it is marvelous, there is
also a yellow and purple form.

Gattinger's Lobelia tall hardy form in couchville cedar glade,
a nice companion to the moth mullein, is abundantly
flowering nearby, there seems to be a more delicate and tender
form that i have photographed at daisy trail glade last year,
the first post or so on this blog, both forms are pictured
in the description at bioimages home for gattingers glade lobelia.














































Here we have an assortment of early bird summer blooms and
some mid spring flowers from Couchville cedar glade.

1.Narrow leaf vervain, verbena simplex

2. Southern Ragwort

3.Ox Eye Daisies

4.Downy Woodmint

5.Early flowering tennessee coneflower

6. Flowering spurge single flower before the spray

7.Gattingers lobelia and ox eye daisy

8. a lone early brown eyed susan

9.False Gromwell, a lush looking borage,

10.leaft prarie clover, Dalea foliosa.



























Catching the Eye

Many interesting colors and textures can be found
for photographing in the cedar glades, from limestone
patterns and interesting dry creek beds,to grass ,trees
and sky, here are a few photos i'd like to share of
scenes that caught my eye on a cool breezy day in May.















Thursday, May 7, 2009

Daisy Trail Glade, may 7 2009 flooded!

Flooded! percy preist lake has inundated
the lower cedar glade limestone area,
and its now gladier than ever! not every
day you see a pair of mallards swimming
in a cedar glade!

we also have some of Daisy Trail Glades
unique daisies, Astranthium integrifolium, (thanks Gail
of clay and limestone blog
) in full bloom.
they are indeed a light pink , and very tender,
nothing like the common ox eye daisy you see
on roadsides, or the other flower pictured, which
is also in full bloom now.








Sun Drenched Islands in the Dark Cedars

You may have encountered a cedar glade before if you enjoy walking through the woods in the Nashville Tennessee area, you would have been walking along through the cedars and would have come to a clearing, upon passing through you may have noticed how hot and dry it was,if in summer,or how wet and spongy the limestone gravel was ,if in winter.You may have had many of my own first thoughts , wondering "is this an old lot? perhaps and old road of some sort long degraded" before you started to notice plants you hadn't ever seen in your life,even though you've lived your entire life in the Nashville area, and if you had been lucky enough to happen across one during spring bloom time you'd notice the rainbow of colors blooming on those never before encountered plants, what an exiting place these glades can be!
In truth that place you thought may have been an old lot is a natural limestone clearing, Sometimes tens of thousands of years old , old enough for the plants there to adapt to their unique micro climate.
It's feasible to think that these places have been visited by animals and humans alike, for thousands upon thousands of years, being a natural clearing where one could camp or simply gaze up at the sky,and the way it seems so much bigger in the glades somehow, you can see the whole milky way sparkling there on a clear summer night, these places truly are a gift of natural beauty and diversity and a testament to the strength of life and its ability to adapt.

Sadly most of this rare ecosystem has been lost forever ,and some endemic plants are either extinct or severely endangered, in the past they have been built on ,dumped in,and covered over with rubble, they are inundated by man made lakes and torn apart by people with atv's and four wheelers who do not realize what they are doing.
There may be less than 10% of what cedar glade
there was before the Nashville basin was settled, and that continues to shrink even today, So lets educate our friends in the world of horticulture about our cedar glades.

Here are some resources for Cedar Glade Research:

Cedar Glade Endemic Plants

Center for Cedar Glade Studies

Cedar Glade Wikipedia